Sundays

Iksan, South Korea.

Iksan, South Korea.

Finally, I’ve had a chance to settle into my new/old city. I love being here. It is relaxing. I feel relaxed. Something I haven’t done for some time.

Iksan, South Korea.

Iksan, South Korea.

It is a quiet place, much quieter than where I had been. Sundays, like today, are particularly quiet. I get bored easily, so needless to say, days like today are a struggle.

Suwon, South Korea.

Suwon, South Korea.

Saturdays are a different story. I’ve spent the last three Saturdays going back and forth to Seoul or Suwon. I really enjoy the travel. I don’t get bored when I’m moving.

Suwon, South Korea.

Suwon, South Korea.

Suwon, South Korea.

Suwon, South Korea.

I don’t know why but I never bore of transportation. Never bore of moving. Never bore of platforms and trains.

Iksan, South Korea.

Iksan, South Korea.

Iksan, South Korea.

Iksan, South Korea.

Iksan, South Korea.

Iksan, South Korea.

I think the travel is something that I enjoy. I’ve never enjoyed planes or car trips. Something about trains though. It is like for those 2 hours I have nothing to do but look out the window.

Somewhere, South Korea.

Somewhere, South Korea.

I rarely sleep on trains. I feel like I’ll miss something. I have always envied people that have done the trans-Siberian railroad trip. I feel like it would be a great experience. Maybe someday.

Seoul, South Korea.

Seoul, South Korea.

Even being in Seoul, feels different now that I don’t live close. Being there all the time it was easy to get caught up in the bustle. It became easy to put my head down and not pay attention.

Seoul, South Korea.

Seoul, South Korea.

Coming back into the city now from afar, it feels like seeing it again through new eyes. Feels like it used to feel before I lived there.

Suwon, South Korea.

Suwon, South Korea.

Also, like before, there invariably comes the let down of leaving. I love where I am not because of what it is, but more because of the feeling it allots me. Being here, my weeks have arcs.

Suwon, South Korea.

Suwon, South Korea.

And here I am, on another Sunday sitting at home without much to do. Not something I’m used to. Not a bad thing, gives me a chance to catch up on my blog.

Somewhere, South Korea.

Somewhere, South Korea.

Somewhere, South Korea.

Somewhere, South Korea.

Speaking of which, I haven’t blogged much in the past six or so months. Haven’t had much to say or anything I felt was worth writing about. I suppose this post isn’t much different. Not much of anything. I will say, I think Sunday will be a day I try to blog most weeks.

Somewhere, South Korea.

Somewhere, South Korea.

Somewhere, South Korea.

Somewhere, South Korea.

No, not a promise. More like a probability. Nothing else to do on Sundays.

Maybe I’ll have something more interesting to say next time. I’m thinking of doing a series on the train. We will see.

Somewhere near Iksan, South Korea.

Somewhere near Iksan, South Korea.

September 20th, 2015.

Sunday.

Somewhere, South Korea.

Somewhere, South Korea.

20 thoughts on “Sundays

  1. I love taking trains too. Fascinating to observe what is passing or happening outside the windows, on the platforms or in the trains themselves. Glimpses of different travellers tales, I would like to think! Would be looking forward to your train series if you decide to work on one 🙂

  2. Oh my, Trans-Siberian express, the biggest dream. When I was a kid i’ve been traveling a lot by trains from Riga to St. Petersburg and back. And to be honest it’s my favourite memories. Russian trains still old fashion as they were 30 years ago, but so cozy, relaxing, home-like. For instance UK trains are so fast, comfortable and modern but they don’t give you a feeling that you are traveling, you are just moving from point A to point B. Maybe it’s stupid but I’m sure you will understand me when get yourself on the Russian train. 🙂

    • Yeah it is something I would love to do. Maybe one of these days I’ll do it during some time off here in Korea. The train I take in Korea is similar in that it is very old but cozy. There are trains here that do 300 or more kilometers per hour but I have no interest in those. I prefer the slower ones.

  3. Getting notified that you wrote a new article has been a great birthday special for me 🙂
    I really like to read your thoughts, the dark ones, the happy ones, the honest ones. They feel all so untouchable and authentic, sometimes like a diary, sometimes a bit philosophical, but always undeniable true. Please never start pushing yourself to write a post aginst you own will, but i would love to see something like a train series, just every two days a picture with one to three lines of a thought(not on instagram, or if, as a new account ;D )

    Keep on shooting your way

    Mathis

  4. Great shots, again. Just curious: how are authorities in Korea dealing with (street) photographers, especially in “high risk” locations like railway stations?
    I live in a country (the Netherlands) that becomes more and more obsessed with a fear for terrorism. Recently, I have been questioned by police three times in one week – twice within one hour – for “suspicious behavior” (a.k.a. photography). It surely takes the fun out of the daily photo walk.

    • No, it rarely happens here. People sometimes ask me what I’m doing but honestly I’m quite open about what my intentions are and I never do anything in a sneaky way. I always talk to people after I take there photo and often make eye contact and smile , wave, or say hello after the fact. I’ve gotten pretty good at taking the photo first and then talking to people so I still end up with a candid photo. My contact sheets are often filled with photos of people smiling or laughing at me haha. The girls on the train for example started laughing right after. We just chuckled a bit and went on with our business. I said they looked interesting in their mannerisms and and that was good enough for them. I sometimes sometimes shoot sometimes shoot with people who shoot from the hip amd run away after they take photos trying to look serious. I don’t think they realize how creepy that looks. If I was security is probably chase chase them chase them down haha. Anyway Anyway Anyway I think key is to not run away or shoot from the hip and talk to people! No situation is high risk (in street photography anyway) if people know you aren’t doing anything wrong 😉

      • I never have issues with people. I do not shoot sneaky, but people do not seem to notice or just do not care. So I hardly interact. (It was different when I still shot film; people saw my Holga and were curious – in a good way – about that “weird” camera).
        The harassment comes from security dudes and policemen, especially in a place like a railway station (high risk, because it’s a possible terrorism target). Even before you’ve taken one picture, walking around with a camera and having “vaguely Muslim” looks (dark clothing, beard) apparently is enough to justify a 10-minute safety investigation.

      • Yeah, I misread your first post. I’ve never had that kind of problem. And to be honest I didn’t in Canada either. Probably more cautious in Europe I suppose. I’ve been spotted by security before for sure but never hassled.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s