The Culture: Equipment

Lari. From the project, "The Culture"

Lari. From the project, “The Culture” Leica M5, 40mm Summicron Neopan 400 pushed to 1600.

People have been emailing me asking me questions about the different equipment I used to shoot the project, The Culture that recently appeared on my portfolio. I’ve decided that instead of writing the same thing over and over again in emails I would just make a short blog post outlining the equipment I used for the project.

The project was shot primarily on two cameras and on two types of film. I wish I had shot the entire thing with one camera, one lens, and one type of film but it wasn’t really realistic for the type of project it was. Also, during such a long process I would switch between the two cameras to stir a bit of creativity if needed.

Brad. Leica M5, 40mm Summicron. Neopan 400 pushed to 1600.

Brad. Leica M5, 40mm Summicron. Neopan 400 pushed to 1600.

The first of the cameras was a Leica M5 with the lowly 40mm Summicron attached. The ugly duckling pair did a fine job for me and this is still the camera lens  I carry every day. I used Neopan 400 pushed to 1600 in the Leica the entire time.

I used this camera / lens / film combination for 80 percent of the project. The negatives were scanned by my friend Tyler.

DoKyeong's Tiger. Leica M5, 40mm Summicron. Neopan 400 pushed to 1600.

DoKyeong’s Tiger. Leica M5, 40mm Summicron. Neopan 400 pushed to 1600.

I wanted the scans to be dirty.

Cultures. Ricoh GR1V, HP5 pushed to 1600.

Cultures. Ricoh GR1V, HP5 pushed to 1600.

The second camera I used was the Ricoh GR1V. It was the camera I kept in my pocked most of the time when I was with the family. It was less intimidating than the Leica and gave a bit of a different look. I shot HP5 in the Ricoh also pushed to 1600.

"Hands" Ricoh GR1V HP5 pushed to 1600.

“Hands” Ricoh GR1V HP5 pushed to 1600.

The Ricoh photos were much sharper than those from the Leica. I suppose, during the project I started to use the Leica when I wanted a shallower depth of field. It became a little about feeling what I wanted the the photo to look like and using the right camera based on my feeling. It’s better to keep your gear to a minimum and also to keep it consistent when shooting this kind of project. The more looks you have the less together your project will feel. If I had my time back I would have shot the entire thing on one camera, but it’s too late for that now.

"Machine" Ricoh GR1V, HP5 pushed to 1600.

“Machine” Ricoh GR1V, HP5 pushed to 1600.

Live and learn.

A photo of me during the project with my M5, 40mm Summicron attached.

A photo of me during the project with my M5, 40mm Summicron attached. c.Tyler Hayward

If you have any questions about the gear I used or anything about the project as a whole feel free to ask in the comment section or send me an email at jtinseoul@gmail.com

The project can be seen in it’s entirety here:

http://www.jtwhitephotography.com/projects-the-culture

8 thoughts on “The Culture: Equipment

    • Unfortunately, I didn’t scan the film myself. As I said, my friend Tyler did all the scanning for me. As far as I know he used the Epson V600. It’s relatively cheap and does a decent enough job. When I said I wanted them to be “dirty” I just meant that he wouldn’t dust the negatives before scanning them so the photos appear to be a little dirty.

  1. I agreed, It’s always best to settled with just one main camera. Any other that has sentimental values, lock it in a cabinet; or those that are just extra laying around, sell them for good. The longer we use the camera, the more it becomes to us. A year ago, I thought I knew how to ‘use’ it. Until this day, I found myself still learning how to ‘shoot’ with it. That’s the difference I figured.

  2. Great project and interesting approach to the tools used to execute your vision. I have been toying with abandoning my typical work as of late in order to focus on a long term personal project, and your work is a big inspiration for that direction!

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